We tell you these only if you promise to look after them.

It’s tough to write a guide to secret beaches without the fear of losing the very essence that makes these sandy shores so special. Do you promise to take care when you visit? Good, no littering, take you rubbish home with you, keep it intimate, take only photos and we’re good to go.

Shelly Beach

A rare north facing beach, this sheltered turquoise hued sandy strip is ideal for rock fishing, swimming and seaside picnics. Shelly is located in Booti Booti National Park and accessible via a scenic 800m walk. Due to its remoteness some locals enjoy skinny dipping here so whilst the ocean views are stunning, there may just be some unexpected sights you can’t unsee.

Shelly Beach, Pacific Palms
Shelly Beach, Pacific Palms

Number 1 Beach

Another ideal north facing beach, this aptly named location is in the charming village of Seal Rocks. It’s safe swimming shores appeal to families and when the swell is up there’ll likely be surfers about too. Tip: pack your snorkel mask for when visibility is clear.

Number 1 Beach, Seal Rocks
Number 1 Beach, Seal Rocks

Cellito Beach

A favourite wave for surfers and sun worshippers alike. The short drive on a dusty gravel access road puts off a lot of visitors, making Cellito Beach prized by locals for its semi-secret location. Park your car and meander down the wooden boardwalk enveloped by cabbage palms and be greeted by a pristine white sand beach and a vivid blue beach. It truly is heavenly here. Tip: there’s no shops about so bring your own snacks, oh and take any rubbish with you – thanks.

Cellito Beach
Cellito Beach

Little Gibber

Best accessed via a 4WD adventure, Little Gibber is the perfect place for a secluded beach getaway in the Myall Lakes National Park. You’ll find shelter from the wind on either side of the point and see gorgeous views of Broughton Island, just offshore. Little Gibber, otherwise known as Dark Point, has significant cultural meaning in aboriginal history and acted as a gathering place for the Worimi people for over 4,000 years.

Little Gibber, Myall Lakes National Park
Little Gibber, Myall Lakes National Park

Sandbar Beach

Sandbar Beach has prime position between Smiths Lake and Myall Lakes National Park. This is the southern portion of the sandy strip that starts at Cellito Beach headland and ends at the lake entrance. Sandbar is the only 4WD beach access road in this part of the Barrington Coast so it’s a popular spot for beach fishing and 4WD enthusiasts, just make sure you have a valid beach driving permit from MidCoast Council. What makes this beach particularly is dreamy is the serene waterway on one side and the wild untameable ocean on the other.

Where Sandbar Beach meets Smiths Lake
Where Sandbar Beach meets Smiths Lake

Burgess Beach

Another great beach that the locals would prefer we didn’t share with you but hey, you’ve already promised to take care when visiting, right? Sitting snugly amid Cape Hawke and Booti Booti National Park it’s a top spot for exploring small rock caves and discovering beach treasures on the shoreline.

Burgess Beach, Forster
Burgess Beach, Forster

McBrides Beach

The steep walking track to access McBrides has been recently renovated by NPWS and the effort will test you initially. But by gosh the natural scenery here is exceedingly rewarding. We’re talking a postcard perfect beach, dramatically pretty and an ideal find for those seeking an uncrowded escape from the everyday.

Mc Brides Beach Booti Booti National Park Ben Andrews 1
McBrides Beach, Booti Booti National Park
McBrides Beach, Booti Booti National Park

The Tanks

Looking for a safe swimming spot and secluded rock pools for snorkelling? Terrific because The Tanks is just the place for you. Located along Bicentennial Walk at Forster, the location gets its name from the steel ship tanks that were formerly located here during the construction of the breakwall. Hint: bring along a packed lunch (or pick up some gourmet fish and chips) and park yourself at the picnic tables here. Some might say million dollar views mate, but we’ll go with priceless.

The Tanks, Forster
The Tanks, Forster

Kylies Beach

Named after the Australian writer Kylie Tennant (not the other famous Aussie Kylie) this beach is a reminder of what our wildest beaches used to look like: remote and windswept with coastal forest descending right to the dunes. You can explore the area on foot, take a short stroll along Metcalfes walking track which links Kylies Beach campground to nearby Indian Head campground. The area is recovering from the 2019 bushfires and 4WD beach access is closed indefinitely, so it’s a good time to sit on those lonely sands and consider our first peoples of the Biripi who confidently strode these shores fully self-sufficient.

Kylies Beach, Crowdy Bay National Park
Kylies Beach, Crowdy Bay National Park

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